The Power of Emojis in Marketing and How to Use Them Efficiently With These Little-Known Keyboard Shortcuts

Did you know: Over 6 billion emojis are shared every day!

Clearly, using emojis within messages, tweets, and all kinds of communication has become very popular over recent years, particularly on mobile devices where emoji buttons and keyboards have become quite ubiquitous.

But what if you’re working from a desktop and hoping to add an emoji or two to a message?

We’ve got a little-known emoji tip just for you – one that is easy to remember and quick to use. In this post, we’ll cover the little-known shortcuts to share emojis from Mac and Windows desktop as well as sharing how to use emojis to boost your social media posts.

Get ready for some fun!

The little-known shortcut for adding emojis on Mac and Windows

How to add emojis on Mac (keyboard shortcut): CTRL + CMD + Space

Add-emoji

1. Click on any text field

Position your cursor in any text field where you’d like to add an emoji. For example, you can do this in a Buffer post:

emoji-step-1

2. Press Command + Control + Space

Press the Command and Control keys on your Mac keyboard and then press Space:

mac-keyboard

3. Choose your emoji from the list

You’ll now see the emoji keyboard palette launch within your screen:

emoji-palette

You can scroll through all the available emojis and categories (People, Nature, Food & Drink, Celebration, Activity, Travel & Places, and Objects & Symbols) or search the full list of emoji from the search box at the top of the window.

scroll-emoji

4. Click to add the emoji to your text

Once you’ve found the emoji you’d like to add, click on it and it’ll appear in your text box to the left of the cursor:

emoji-added

 

How to add emojis on Windows: Touch keyboard

1. Open the Touch Keyboard

Click on the Touch Keyboard icon in the bottom right corner of your screen:

touch-keyboard

If you don’t see the Touch Keyboard option on your desktop, this guide will help you to enable it.

2. Click on the smiley face emoji icon

One the keyboard window has opened up, click on the smiley face icon next to the Control button.

windows-8-touch-keyboard

3. Choose your emoji

Your keyboard will now switch to an emoji keyboard and you can select the emoji you’d like to add to your text field:

emoji-keyboard

How emojis can impact your social media content

Emojis are incredibly fun, and they can also help increase the reach of your social media posts and boost engagement.

For example, internet marketer Larry Kim ran a quick experiment where he split-tested the same promoted post with and without emojis to the same targeting group at the same time. The results of this experiment were pretty impressive. The emoji version had 25.4% higher engagement (11.06 percent vs. 8.82 percent) and a 22.2 percent lower cost per engagement ($0.18 vs. $0.14)

larry-kim

3 simple-yet-effective ways to use emojis in your marketing

1. As a response

Emojis can be a great way to respond to people on social media. Instead of simply ‘liking’ or ‘favoriting’ a post, an emoji can convey a specific emotion. For example, if something made you laugh, the :joy: emoji could be a great one to react with <img src="http://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/72×72/1f602.png&quot; alt="

I Will Say This About Hillary….

She should consider herself very lucky that she is running against Trump….

Cruz, Rubio…… even Jeb……. If that cheeto toned clown had not bashed all the decent people out of the way….. I believe Hillary would be in a fight for her life in this race….

Everyone was quick to dump Cruz….. I just dont get it….

Windows A/Cs with automatic (not manual) dehumidification?

Does there exist a window or portable A/C that will go into dehumidify while in cooling mode if the compressor is not running? The units I have seen have a separate dehumidify mode which then precludes cooling and vice versa. I want one that will dry the air if the a/c is slightly oversized, which causes the compressor to not run enough to dry the air.

TXV Woes

Ok I had a no cool call the other day that has been giving me trouble. I found a bad condenser fan motor and a dirty evaporator coil. Cleaned the coil and replaced the motor. Turned the unit on and it purred like a kitten. pressures where spot on. The unit was cooling great. I leave and go to two more calls, and the shop calls me and tells me the customer called and the unit quit cooling. I finish the call im on and head back over there the compressor wasn’t running. I ohm it out and all is good so I turn it on and it is running. I notice that the suction line is not sweating now and reach down and feel of it and the liquid line and they feel to be about the same temp. I go to the truck and get my gauges hook them up and I have a very low suction about 38# and the liquid line pressure is about 184# which was standing pressure for the current outdoor ambient of 96 degrees. next thing I know the compressor starts bypassing and then trips on overload. My first thought was a compressor valve issue. I cooled the compressor off tapped on the top of the compressor a bit and turned it back on. Pressures where the same so I jarred the condenser a little, and the pressures went back to normal. So now im definitely thinking compressor valves. I inform the customer that if it happens again we may have to replace the condenser since it is r22 unit. Another tech and a helper go out there a few days later and he checks to see if he can get it to pump down and he determines that the problem is a bad txv so he goes and gets an r22 valve and replaces it. This was friday and as far as i know the unit is still running. My problem is that I have never seen a closed down txv that didn’t have a high liquid line pressure an low suction and I havent seen one make the compressor over heat. Freeze the Evap. coil yes. and never one that would work intermittently. The liquid line pressure not changing is what led me to believe that the problem was the compressor and not the txv. Can someone explain to me what is going on. Thank you

Hanging very heavy carriage doors

Hi – I was lucky enough to find a great Amish builder who made me two pairs of solid mahogany carriage doors for my garage. Each opening is 8×7 and my contractor added additional studs for extra support. The builder estimates them at 130lbs each but it took 4 guys to get each door off the truck and I can barely lift a door a few inches.

My GC is a bit nervous about getting the install right since its hung on hinges that are lag bolted to the underlying structure. The frames aren’t perfectly square so he will need to do some shimming to get it just right. The issue is that he can’t shim the jambs because the lag screws go deep into the supporting frame. So I suggested that he build a temp support to hold the doors in the exact closed position he wants it and then use that to line up the hinges.

Anyone try anything like this before? Given the weight we are worried that they will shift a bit and then will be out of alignment. Or over time they will sag. The lags have a out a 1/32 of an inch of play within the hole of the hinge. Plus the hinges are mounted on the face of the building frame so he can’t shim it horizontally.